3MM

let's watch some movies, let's make some more.

This is what we’re talking about.

Based on a true story, this musical documentary is like none you have witnessed. It’s a story of realizing legendary musical accomplishment and true genius…through someone else…who could give a shit. Neil and Jesse do not fail you with snarky one liners and the absurd humor that puts this short in a genre of its own. Enjoy! And be sure to catch Neil’s piano stylings every Wednesday on the corner of damen and Chicago. 7pm.

We’ve all had that feeling — walking somewhere alone at night, even to somewhere presumably safe, like your own home. And there’s just that pervading feeling that’s telling you there’s someone behind you. Usually, thankfully it’s nothing but your mind playing tricks on you. But as Lauren Eaton shows us in her 3MM, sometimes it’s all too real.

With Master TunerChris Batte takes us inside the Century Mallet Instrument Company and seemingly teleports us to a time where corporations don’t exist, people run their business with love and pride for decades on end, and make works of beauty by hand.  It’s both sad and heartening at the same time.

Just look at the faces of cohorts Jacque and Moe as Mr. Serna sands that key to tune. 

Ramping Back Up

Hey all —

After postponing our last screening of 3MM, we’ve been doing what many of you have been doing: savoring every drop that Chicago summers have to offer. That and working on our films for the next screening (Aug. 6th, 8-10 @ Rodan). With that date in mind, we will be posting the remaining films from our previous installment over the next week. We have some truly inspired creations to share with you. In fact, with a few of these, you may find yourself asking exactly from where that inspiration came, and where you can get some. That’s the beauty of it all really, all the original ideas and techniques each contribution drops on us.

Thanks for your patience, folks. We hope you enjoy!

For our third installment, we took some liberties with our theme. We thought they were minor. For the well known mnemonic, we changed the F in EGBDF from the traditional “fudge” to “fun”. We thought it would allow more freedom for our filmmakers. As you’ll see here, some, namely Mark Smirl, thought this was unnecessary. Let it be known — the man’s a purist.

Greg Shirilla invites us on a journey to the American West with Hicksville Visit #3 (part 1). The content and cinematography suggest a trip into the past as well, and you’ll be sure to appreciate the spot-on song accompaniment to complete the experience. Roadtrip, anyone?

This selection from comes from the mind of David A Holcombe along with Adam Blaszkiewicz and Nicholas Reise.  Belly of the Beast keeps it light on story but really utilizes special effects and quality filming to keep you laughing.  We’re looking forward to more work from these guys!

Univore is back, and yes, they brought Marco Casale with them. Behold.

A 3MM Interview: The Guys Behind Univore

If you ever get to toss back some beers and/or vodka sodas with Univore, do it. These are two of the most laid-back, fun to hang out with dudes (and lady when Nick’s wife, OT, joined us) you’d be so lucky to chill with. 

Univore is a media production duo concentrating in original music, video, and the written word operating out of Chicago’s Ukrainian Village.

Univore, more specifically, is Nicholas Flandro and David Bachmann. You ever seen that commercial where the guy mistakes charcoal for dog food because he needs glasses? That’s Nick’s. Ever seen that feature length horror film about a rock’n’roll cannibal chef? You will soon - Dave’s shopping around a script.

The two met in high school in Ohio, with David from Akron and Nick from Dayton. They split up for some years after graduation, reuniting in Chicago in July 2009. Univore as we know it officially began in February 2010.

Their first album was a spoken word collaboration with Marco Casale released in July 2010. You may remember Marco from his mad b-ball skills showcased in Doubters if you were at the February 3MM showing. Their second album, Love Letters, was released in March 2011 and was also followed up by music videos and more Casale. The third album is in the works, and we’re pretty stoked to see what Nick and David have in store for us.

You may be wondering where Marco Casale comes from and what is his role in all of this. Casale is an artist and poet who frequents Happy Village - where Nick tends bar. Casale also fits into what Univore has going on perfectly, so why bust up a good thing? 

Univore's primary focus is the music. David's first instrument is guitar. Nick's is drums. That being said, between the two of them, they play just about every instrument there is - or would if they got their hands on it. The videos came naturally afterward and they're f'in top notch. There's this dark, smart humor in them all. At times they might make you a little uncomfortable - or maybe that's just me (cue Chubby Luggage) - you will definitely laugh. It’s easy to take the filming and editing for granted, because they do it so well. They make it look easy.

These guys have been making stuff together for a long time. How do they do it? Isn’t there ever big creative conflict? “If one of us really has a problem with something, we just push it aside.”

Thanks Univore, for taking the time to hang out and let 3MM folks learn a little more about you. We can’t wait to see what you come up with next.

The Contest” effortlessly builds suspense and begs the audience to throw out guesses as to what these two gents are building towards. Or, maybe more accurately, the expressive performances, magnetic cinematography, rhythmic editing and playful soundtrack all lend themselves to the feeling of effortlessness. What is clear is how successful Kamal Williams was in bringing his vision to the screen, proof being that even after the mystery is revealed, “The Contest” is eminently re-watchable.

No matter of what you think of Univore's Marco Casale's release on the court, there's little denying his star-making turn in this 3MinuteMovie. “Doubters” is truly an original, with laughs and nods of recognition at every turn. I feel that in Univore we may have true auteurs on our hands. Enjoy.

In just 3 minutes, Peoples Media Project's overarching “Minute 2 Midnite” reminds us what's at stake in the world. The group captures people from all over the globe in the throes of activism despite the powers that be trying desperately to quiet them. The voices and faces they capture are diverse and real. The editing is precise and engaging. Their message is affecting.

It feels like Mark Smirl is waging a war in which he is the only one fighting. But make no mistake, he is winning. When we last heard from him, he appeared to be innocently focused on the aspect of time in his 3MinuteMovie experiment. We called it a meditation. Well, Mark upped the ante with his next contribution called “Extreme Meditation”, which is, you guessed it, literally just that. Bravo, Mark. We’re here, anxiously awaiting what you decide to throw at us next.

Credit Brian Foster for creating this engaging and cryptic psychological mystery titled “Another”. Existential questions persist in his short film, ending, as is does all too often in life, elliptically. And it’s easy to admire the high quality of cinematography, visual effects and sound design he employs too. Big ups, Mr. Foster.